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Introducing “Money Man”     −by Stephen Alpert LM10 with Mike Bannon RM413
{ from  Fall 2009 BoTales }
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   The Spring 2009 issue of BoTales pictured two of my hobo nickels in the “Three's A Match” feature. Art DelFavero found a third matching hobo nickel while searching through the OHNS archive copies of Quality Designation forms. It is the 1913S Type II nickel, owned by member Michael Brannon of California (who purchased it about ten years ago at a coin shop in southern California, for $250). My two specimens are on 1914 nickels. The one with the flatter-topped hat (and hair not touching the back of the neck) I bought in 1999 for $125 from an eBay seller from Sacramento, California (not an auction). The other nickel (circular hat dome and more-worn date) was part of a collection of hobo nickels (mostly modern) I purchased in early 2008 from a southern California collector. So, all three pieces were acquired in California.
   The unique feature of all three carvings is the dollar sign before the date, making the date look like a dollar amount. So I am nicknaming this old carver “Money Man.” All three share the diagnostic features described below.
   The carving characteristics for “Money Man” are listed as follows:
    1) A dollar sign ($) to the left of the date,
    2) The derby has a small dome with accent lines,
    3) The hat brim has wrap-around ends that are lobe-like (or pod-, tongue-, or finger-like),
    4) The hat band has a bowtie above the ear that extends up above the band,
    5) The ear is small,
    6) Well-groomed carved hair, mustache, and small pointy beard,
    7) Smoothly-dressed field, with Liberty removed,
    8) The collar is checkered at the bottom, with a flap or flaps at the front,
    9) A stickpin is at the front of the collar,
   10) A slight Adams apple bulge on the neck,
   11) The profile may be altered at the top of the nose and
   12) On early date nickels.
Introducing “Pencil Neck”     −by Marc Banks RM538 with Arturo DelFavero RM552
{ from  Fall 2009 BoTales }
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   The Spring 2008 issue of BoTales pictured the first two examples of hobo nickels by a carver I'm calling “Pencil Neck” for the narrow or recessed neck on all of the example nickels. The first example sold on eBay back on March 27, 2003 for $84.83. I purchased the second example more than ten years ago at a coin show in Massachusetts for just $60. The third example was Lot 11 in OHNS Auction 11 and sold for $33 on January 11, 2003. After the first two nickels appeared in the Three's A Match segment in 2008, Art DelFavero found the third example while looking through old OHNS Auction catalogs.
   The carving characteristics for “Pencil Neck” are listed as follows:
    1) A high crowned derby setting low on head with curved brim and hatband with rectangular bow-
         pointed towards the back and with horizontal lines,
    2) Derby's brim reaches all the way back behind the shoulder,
    3) Carved hair with thin extension from beard to forehead below hat brim,
    4) No ear,
    5) Punched beard,
    6) Point graver stubble/mustache,
    7) Liberty has been removed, the date is visible on one example,
    8) Finely lined tall shirt collar with fancy front- 8) & 9) are only on the first example,
    9) Wedged jacket collar and
   10) Enlarged nostril, notched nose and punched eye.
Introducing “Carvetoon”
    −by Arturo DelFavero RM552 with Owen Covert RM686 with Ralph Winter LM37
{ from  Fall 2009 BoTales }
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   In December 2008 our webmaster Verne Walrafen featured a letter written by Wendy Circosta, assistant curator of the Power House Museum in Australia. Among Wendy's text were photos of four Hobo/Love token style nickels donated to the museum by the late William D. Bush formerly of Vancouver, Washington. At this point, the criteria were established for a new nicknamed hobo nickel artist. Since being posted on the website, 5 others have worked their way out of the “metal work.” Shown here are the first four, “Cat, Mouse, and Spider” (possibly early depiction of Tom and Jerry) on a 1912 Liberty nickel, “Jiggs” (1916 Buffalo) from the comic strip Bringing Up Father, “Mr. Dithers” (1925 Buffalo) from Blondie, and “Sarge” (1935 Buffalo) from Beetle Bailey. The next 5 are owned by individual collectors: “Mickey Mouse” (1926 buffalo) owned by Ralph winter, “Horse in a Field” (dateless buffalo) owned by Jon Stock, “Devil with Pitchforks” (1907 Liberty) owned by Art DelFavero, “Chaplain Staneglass” (from Beetle Bailey) (1928 Buffalo) owned by Owen Covert, and another “Mickey Mouse” with no engraved border (1918 Buffalo) also owned by Ralph Winter.
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   The name “Carvetoon” was established by Ralph Winter when I mentioned Owen Covert's suggestion of “Carl Toon”, my choice was the “Comic Stripper”. His works show a real stylized type of quality that is rare and maybe unique to his body of work. It seems to me that this artist made the jump from making Love Tokens to his own versions of Hobo Nickels, thus bridging the gap between the 19th and 20th century.
   The carving characteristics for “Carvetoon” are listed as follows:
    1) Cartoon or Cartoon-like engravings,
    2) Love token style renderings on 20th century coins (mostly nickels),
    3) Strictly hand engraved coins no assisted powered tools used,
    4) Most carvings have ornamental borders (2 shown borderless),
    5) Straight lines remain from removal of metal in creating the smooth engraving surface and
    6) All are reverse carvings with total removal of reverse coin design elements.