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144
"Hobo Nickel" added to Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ... 6/05
143
4-4-0 -from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ... 6/05
142
Railroads Shipped by Sea −by Wendell W. Huffman ... 6/05
141
The Hobo News A Street Newspaper ... 6/05
140
A Bergie Pulls Up Stakes! A Steve Adams carving ... 6/05
139
Two More Nicknamed Old Hobo Nickel Artists -from BoTales2005#2 ... 6/05
138
Buy What Makes You Smile! ...a Steve Ellsworth “Eskimo” carving ... 6/05
137
Imperatoris Caesaris Traiani Hadriani Augusti A Michael Cirelli carving ... 6/05
136
  Carving Chips.....   • Looking for an Actual Photograph of Sacramento No.1 • 
135
  Carving Chips.....   • B&BMedal ... “Bo&Bert” not “Bed&Breakfast” • 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
134
W. Eddings ~ Gadsden, Alabama April 16, 1999 obituary ... 5/05
133
  Carving Chips.....   • Steve Ellsworth's First Nickel Carvings • 
132
That Just Wasn't “Good Enough”! ...a Bill Jameson “recarved” nickel ... 5/05
131
An Impressive Body of Work! A complete Lee Griffiths archive ... 5/05
130
Preeminent “Jungle” Cook A Bill Jameson original nickel carving ... 5/05
129
The First Railroad Ride in California ~ SVRR ~ August 17, 1855 ... 5/05
128
  Carving Chips.....   • Unemployed MKT Workers” −by Lee Griffiths •  
127
A Handful of Feathers -from Harper's Weekly... November 29, 1884 ... 5/05
126
My View for the Last Three Weeks −by V-Dubya ... 5/05
125
Albert and ET −by Ralph “Hobo Bazoo” Winter ... 5/05
124
  Carving Chips.....   • Jewish Hobo Nickels” -from The Shekel... March-April 2004  •  
123
  Carving Chips.....   • The Apple Orchard Raider” −by Steven “Mr.Chips” Adams •  
Continue reading older TABLE OF CONTENTS for OHNS NEWS items in our SCRAPBOOK
144 
30 June 2005
It took V-Dubya many hours over the last couple days to learn enough about coding Wiki pages to get Steve's article “A History of Hobo Nickels” added to WikipediA. I had to use nickel carving images that I created myself so that their ownership was clear and I could put them in the Public Domain but I think you'll like the results. It sure shows off Steve's scholarship in good light and, hopefully, to a different demographic... non-collectors... non-numismatists.  −V-Dubya
• • • Check out Wikipedia's “Hobo Nickel”Click to access the Wikipedia website. and let me know what you think! • • •
The non-profit Wikimedia Foundation, operates several multilingual and free-content projects:
Wikipedia
The free encyclopedia
Wiktionary
Dictionary and thesaurus
Wikibooks
Free textbooks and manuals
Wikiquote
Collection of quotations
Wikisource
Free source documents
Wikispecies
Directory of species
Wikinews
Free content news source
Commons
Shared media repository
Meta-Wiki
Wikimedia project coordination
143 
27 June 2005
Click to search for “4-4-0 standard”.Click to access the AbsoluteAstronomy website.Click to access the Wikipedia website.

What a strange turn of events... When I made a simple Google search for “4-4-0 standard” it took me to www.AbsoluteAstronomy.com which seemed an unlikely place for information on locomotives. There I noted that they had credited en.WikipediA.org as their information source... so I went to WikipediA and found one of the most fantastic resources I've ever found thus far on the WorldWideWeb.

• • • Check out WikipediAClick to access the Wikipedia website. and judge for yourself! • • •

Where there isn't any information yet on a linked subject the reader is encouraged to input information into the WikipediA database. Best of all the whole body of work is FREE! It is weird that some websites require payment before you can read their material, others insist that their posted information not be used by anyone for any purpose other than simply reading, and then we have a few leaders that promote the totally free access and dissemination of their information.  −V-Dubya

“4-4-0” ~ From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 
 #87, delivered - from the  of .  This is a 5 ft (1524 mm) gauge 4-4-0 with 54 in (1.37 m) drivers.  Shown during delivery on flatcars due to gauge incompatibility.  Note the elaborate ornamentation.  #87 is a wood-burner with a spark-arresting “balloon” stack. Enlarge
Atlantic, Mississippi and Ohio Railroad #87, delivered 1873-10-27 from the Mason Machine Works of Taunton, Massachusetts. This is a 5 ft (1524 mm) gauge 4-4-0 with 54 in (1.37 m) drivers. Shown during delivery on flatcars due to gauge incompatibility. Note the elaborate ornamentation. #87 is a wood-burner with a spark-arresting “balloon” stack.
A 4-4-0 is a type of steam locomotive. In the Whyte notation, 4-4-0 signifies that it has a two-axle bogie to help guide it into curves, and two driving axles coupled by a connecting rod. The 4-4-0 is most commonly known as an American type. Almost every major railroad that operated in North America in the first half of the 19th century owned and operated locomotives of this type. The famous locomotive named The General was a 4-4-0. The equivalent UIC classification is 2'B.
The first use of the name American to describe locomotives of this wheel arrangement was made by Railroad Gazette in April 1872. Before that time, this wheel arrangement was known as a Standard or Eight-Wheeler. This locomotive type was so successful on US railroads that many earlier 4-2-0 and 2-4-0 locomotives were rebuilt as 4-4-0s by the middle of the 19th century.
The first 4-4-0 design was developed by Henry R. Campbell, then the chief engineer for the Philadelphia, Germantown and Norristown Railway. Campbell received a patent for the design in February 1836, and he soon set to work building the first 4-4-0. New locomotive construction in the USA had begun only five years earlier at the West Point Foundry with the Best Friend of Charleston in 1831.
 class  4-4-0 #317, built in .  This high-drivered (78") passenger locomotive is coal-fired, indicated by the straight stack.  Elaborate decoration is now out of fashion. Enlarge
Pennsylvania Railroad class D6 4-4-0 #317, built in 1881. This high-drivered (78") passenger locomotive is coal-fired, indicated by the straight stack. Elaborate decoration is now out of fashion.
For the time, Campbell's 4-4-0 was a giant among locomotives. Its cylinders measured 14 inch (356 mm) in diameter with a 16 in (406 mm) piston stroke, it boasted 54 in (1.37 m) diameter driving wheels, could maintain 90 lb/in (620 kPa) of steam pressure and weighed 12 tons. Campbell's locomotive was estimated to be able to pull a 450 ton train at 15 mph (24 km/h) on level track, beating the strongest of Baldwin's 4-2-0s in tractive effort by around 63%. However, with all of the increased power in Campbell's design, the frame and driving gear of his locomotive proved too rigid for the railroads of the time. Campbell's prototype was too prone to derailments.
At about the same time as Cambell was building his 4-4-0, the company of Eastwick and Harrison was building its own version of the 4-4-0. This locomotive, named Hercules, was completed in 1837 for the Beaver Meadow Railroad. The Hercules was built with a leading bogie that was separate from the locomotive frame, making it much more suitable to the tight curves and quick grade changes of early railroads.
Even though Hercules and its successors from Eastwick and Harrison proved the viability of the new wheel arrangement, the company remained the sole builders of this type of locomotive for another two years. William Norris built that company's first 4-4-0 in 1839, followed by Rogers, Locks and Canals and Newcastle in 1840. Henry Campbell didn't sit idly by while other manufacturers started building their own 4-4-0s. Like many executives of the modern era, Campbell sued other manufacturers and railroads for infringing on his patent. Baldwin settled with Campbell in 1845 by purchasing a license to build 4-4-0s.
As the 1840s progressed, the design of the 4-4-0 changed little, but the dimensions of a typical example of this type increased. The boiler lengthened, drive wheels grew in diameter and the fire grate increased in area. Early 4-4-0s were short enough that it was most practical to connect the pistons to the rear driving axle, but as the boiler lengthened, the connecting rod was more frequently connected to the front driving axle.
An  4-4-0 leads one of that railroad's  across  c. . Enlarge
An Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway 4-4-0 leads one of that railroad's passenger trains across Kansas c. 1895.
In the following decade, locomotive manufacturers began extending the wheelbase of both the leading bogie and the driving axles. By placing the axles farther from each other, manufacturers were able to mount a wider boiler completely above the wheels that extended beyond the sides of the wheels. This gave newer locomotives increased heating and steam capacity which translated to higher tractive effort. It was in this decade, the 1850s that the 4-4-0 began to look like the locomotives that are preserved today. There are fewer than 40 surviving 4-4-0s in the United States today, not counting reproductions.
The design and subsequent improvements of the 4-4-0 proved so successful that by 1872, 60% of Baldwin's locomotive construction was of this type, and it is estimated that fully 85% of all locomotives in operation in the USA were 4-4-0s. However, the 4-4-0 was soon supplanted by bigger designs, like the 2-6-0 and 2-8-0, even though the 4-4-0 was still favored for express services. The widespread adoption of the 4-6-0 and even larger locomotives helped seal its fate as a product of the past. By 1900, the 4-4-0 was obsolete in US locomotive manufacture, although they continued to serve branch lines and private industry into the mid 20th century. The last 4-4-0 built was a diminutive Baldwin product in 1945, built for the United of Yucatan Railways.
Retrieved from “en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4-4-0
Steam locomotive types
Single engine types
0-2-2, 2-2-0, 2-2-2, 2-2-4, 4-2-0, 4-2-2, 4-2-4, 6-2-0
0-4-0, 0-4-2, 0-4-4, 2-4-0, 2-4-2, 2-4-4, 4-4-0, 4-4-2, 4-4-4
0-6-0, 0-6-2, 0-6-4, 2-6-0, 2-6-2, 2-6-4, 4-6-0, 4-6-2, 4-6-4
0-8-0, 0-8-2, 2-8-0, 2-8-2, 2-8-4, 4-8-0, 4-8-2, 4-8-4, 6-8-6
0-10-0, 0-10-2, 2-10-0, 2-10-2, 2-10-4, 4-10-0, 4-10-2
0-12-0, 2-12-0, 2-12-2, 2-12-4, 4-12-2
4-14-4
Duplex engine types
4-4-4-4, 6-4-4-6, 4-4-6-4, 4-6-4-4
Mallet (articulated) types
0-4-4-0, 0-4-4-2, 2-4-4-2
0-6-6-0, 2-6-6-0, 2-6-6-2, 2-6-6-4, 2-6-6-6, 4-6-6-4, 2-6-8-0
0-8-8-0, 2-8-8-0, 2-8-8-2, 2-8-8-4, 4-8-8-2, 4-8-8-4
2-10-10-2, 2-8-8-8-2, 2-8-8-8-4

142 
26 June 2005
Railroad History, Bulletin 180, Spring, 1999. pp. 7-30.
By Wendell W. Huffman
Courtesy Railway & Locomotive Historical Society, William F. Howes, Jr., President.

   From the shipping of Elephant in 1850 until well into 1869, very few things changed in the process of ordering and importing locomotives and railroad material for the West Coast. When the Sacramento Valley began importing material in the mid-1850s, not even a telegraph line spanned the country. To arrange orders, the company president made two round trips to the East Coast by steamer and stagecoach crossings of Nicaragua between December 1853 and September 1854. The Sacramento Valley imported rails, spikes, passenger and freight cars, locomotives, turntables, and machine tools, with freight charges amounting to $100,000 − one-third the cost of the material alone. Even civil engineers and artisans were hired from the East.” Wendell W. Huffman, Railroad History Bulletin 180, Spring 1999.

 Click here to read Mr. Huffman's complete article... Click to read Mr. Huffman's complete article. 
R&LHS

Copyrighted 1999 by the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society, Inc., P.O, Box 1418. Westford. Massachusetts 01886. The R&LHSClick to access the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society website., founded in 1921, is the oldest organization in North America devoted to railroad history. Its object is to promote research and encourage documentation.  Source materials printed, manuscript and graphic are housed in the Society's archives in Sacramento, California.  For additional information, contact William H. Lugg, Jr, R&LHS Membership Secretary, P.O. Box 292927, Sacramento, California 95829-2927.

Additionally Mr. Huffman gives us the specifics of the delivery of “Sacramento No.1” to SVRR...
The “Winged Racer” delivered “Sacramento No.1” on June 3rd, 1855Click to view Mr. Huffman's wonderful table.     Cool... Check it out!  −V-Dubya
Listed in order of arrival.
141 
24 June 2005
•  The Hobo News ~ A Street Newspaper  •
Vol.7
~ No.1 ~ December 31, 1946 ~ “A Ripple of Laughter is Worth a Flood of Tears”
A generous gift from Warren Stabler, OHNS-RM848.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.

Not exactly a “Hobo” subject... but this topical concern really grabbed me and I wanted to share it with all y'all.
( There were MANY “Hobo” subject cartoons published! )

Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
A Little Fun to Match the Sorrow” ~ 31 Dec 1946 Click to access the locally archived copy of 1937 Time articles.
Published February'37-April 20,'48, by Patrick “The Roaming Dreamer” Mulkern and Benjamin “The Coast Kid” Benson. Featured articles, poems, cartoons, and occasionally songs about politics, law enforcement, employment, and hobo life that catered to hobo culture... including hobo-sympathizers and hobo-intellectuals. It maintained and promoted a strongly pro-American viewpoint and also served as a political advocate on the behalf of hoboes.
This newspaper is often confused with an earlier publication circa 1915-1929... “James Eads How, an heir to a St.Louis fortune, chose to live his life as a hobo, riding the rails, sleeping in flophouses and wearing old clothes. Fueled by the Social Gospel Movement that adhered to helping relieve the suffering of the poor, Mr. How founded the International Brotherhood Welfare Association and a publication known as the Hoboes Jungle Scout in 1913. That newspaper evolved into the Hobo News in 1915 which became a monthly and lasted until at least 1929. Hobo News in turn evolved into the Hobo World newspaper. The only existing copies of the monthly publication indicate it was mix of job news, poems, sentimental short stories and lore about the life of hoboes.” −Trying to Write a History of the Role of Street Newspapers in the Social Movement to Alleviate Poverty and Homelessness −by Norma Fay Green ~ July 23, 1999 Click to access the locally archived copy of 1937 Time articles.

Cover of 1937 Time Newsmagazine containing Benjamin Benson article
( NOT Mr. Benson on the cover. )
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
This is a Bona Fide Newspaper” ~ 17 May 1937
The Press ~ “For Hoboes: Hobo News”
To the vast surprise of a Manhattan police court last week, a mussy little prisoner informed the judge that the issue at stake in his case was not whether he had been caught peddling in Times Square without a license, but whether or not the U. S. people were to enjoy the rights and privileges of a free press.

Click here to read Time's complete article about Benjamin Benson... Click to read this article. Click to access the locally archived copy of 1937 Time articles.
Copyright 2005 Time Inc. All rights reserved.

Cover of 1937 Time Newsmagazine containing Jeff Davis article
( NOT Mr. Davis on the cover. )
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Perpetual King Jeff Davis” ~ 26 April 1937
Miscellany ~ “Convention”
In St.Louis, Perpetual King Jeff Davis opened the 29th annual “greatest and best” convention of the Hoboes of America. In a grimy hall in the flophouse district, 100 delegates heard greetings from Ohio's Representative Herbert S. (“Brother Bo”) Bigelow, New York's Senator Royal S. Copeland, Warden Lewis E. Lawes of Sing Sing who sent a $10 contribution, President William Green of the American Federation of Labor. Unanimously the hoboes voted to lobby for benches and cots in railroad boxcars and a special 1¢-a-mile hobo rail rate, applauded King Davis when he thumped for enforcement of the 14th Amendment “so that a hobo can go anywhere in this country without being pinched for being broke.”

Click here to read Time's complete article about Jeff Davis... Click to read this article. Click to access the locally archived copy of 1937 Time articles.
Copyright 2005 Time Inc. All rights reserved.
•  Interesting Reading  •
Self-Sufficiency Is Measure Of Chicago Newspaper's Success −by James L. Tyson ~ April 11, 1996 Click to access the locally archived copy of 1937 Time articles.
The American Hobo −by Colin Beesley ~ 1998 Click to access the locally archived copy of 1937 Time articles.
Trying to Write a History of the Role of Street Newspapers in the Social Movement to Alleviate Poverty and Homelessness −by Norma Fay Green ~ July 23, 1999 Click to access the locally archived copy of 1937 Time articles.
Read all about it: street papers flourish across the US −by Danna Harman ~ November 17, 2003
Click to access the locally archived copy of 1937 Time articles.
140 
20 June 2005

Click to view an enlargement of this photograph. Bergie Wyatt at his bon voyage party.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
   A Bergie Pulls Up Stakes! Wyatt, a Bergie1 from Cape Town, was scratching out a meager living providing Guide Services for Otjandaue Safaris, in north-central Namibia, when he heard of the vast riches to be made in the Kansa Territories culling the migratory Bison herds. He was told that this new breed of Bison was invading the territory from both Denver to the west and Philadelphia to the east.
   Much to my surprise I learned today that he will be arriving on my doorstep sometime this month... I'd better rent more locker space just in case he shoots more than we can eat. As you see below, at every layover Wyatt sends me one of the postcards that he bought before leaving the Namibia International Airport!
   I've been informed that the local wildlife in Namibia was ecstatic when they found out that Wyatt was leaving the environs for the provinces in the New World. Judging from the photo they sent the party was a real BLAST!
   As Wyatt boarded one of Air Namibia's McDonnell-Douglas MD11s, he was heard to mutter...
          “After so many years of hunting Damara Dik-Dik for supper, shooting Kansa Bison will be a real jawl2.
   You'd think someone would have told Wyatt that Dik-DikClick to view a photograph of a Dik-Dik., the smallest antelope in the world... about the size of a domestic cat, are a protected species! It is already quite evident that I'm going to have a lot of trouble understanding Wyatt! −V-Dubya
Republic of South Africa SlangClick to access the RSA-Overseas website.                 Damara Dik-DikClick to access the WildlifeSafari website.                 Slang Dictionary and Language LinksClick to access the Peevish website.

   • Bergie1... A hobo who hangs out on the streets of Cape Town. The term Bergie originates from Berg (Mountain), and has connotations, according to prejudice, that Bergies are members of inbred hillbilly clans. This is not really so. It has more to do with alcoholism and tragic social circumstances such as poverty and homelessness.
   • Jawl2... The word jawl is generic South African - it refers to having a good time and can be used in any context. “I am going on a jawl (party) - I am having a jawl (good time).

Special Thanks to Steven G. Adams, Master Nickel Carver, for the unique vision and consummate skill evident in his creation of this delightful nickel carving!

139 
19 June 2005
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Two More Nicknamed Old Hobo Nickel Artists
{ from  BoTales2005#2 }
“Traveler”
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
“Tall Collar”
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.

This time I am introducing two more old nicknamed hobo nickel artists. One {“Traveler”...shown here above} is an old friend we've seen many times before (but his carvings are hard to find.) The other {“Tall Collar”...shown here on the left} is an artist whose works you probably haven抰 seen before −Stephen P. Alpert.

“Traveler”       Click here to read Steve's complete article... Click to read this article.       “Tall Collar”
138 
11 June 2005
Click for a sharper version of this Ellsworth carving.Click for a sharper version of this Ellsworth carving.Click for a sharper version of this Ellsworth carving.Click for a sharper version of this Ellsworth carving.Click for a sharper version of this Ellsworth carving.Click for a sharper version of this Ellsworth carving.Click for a sharper version of this Ellsworth carving.Click for a sharper version of this Ellsworth carving.
Click on any photo for a sharper enlarged version. 
I駏piaq Iglaaq
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.

 Buy What Makes You Smile!
Recently I spent a few weeks up in Alaska doing artwork for a Bed & Breakfast in Fairbanks. While there I had an opportunity to travel north and meet some of the locals. This old gentleman really made an impression on me. I was freezing my duff and he was warm as toast. Bald with no teeth, he couldn't comprehend how it was that I didn't have a fur coat to keep me warm. The coastal Indians are some pretty interesting people. We had a great time munching on smoked salmon. Anyway to make a long story short. I thought I would make this coin in his likeness. I know he'll never see it but it was fun to do.
I feel that, as with any art form, it's best to acquire one of a kind pieces from those who produce art for arts sake. Build a good collection of coins that makes you feel good inside, one that will provide you with many years of enjoyment and increase in value over time. You won't be sorry. ~ Steve Ellsworth... Saturday, 11 June 2005, 7:04:35am

 This gentleman's tribal name is spelled two different ways... I駏piaq and I駏piat. “I駏piaq{Eskimo, literally 憆eal person拀” words vary according to whether the person lives in a North Slope village or a Kobuk River village. I've decided to name this carving “I駏piaq Iglaaq{Traveler}” since it is as close as I can figure to hobo, vagrant or wanderer. Other choices could have been “ataniq{Leader}”, “ataataga{Grandfather}” or “avilaitqan{Friend}”.
This deep carving of an Eskimo by Colorado based South Western Artist, Steve Ellsworth, brings to mind the wonderful “Native Alaska Eskimo Portraits” by George Glenn Rodgers. I don't suppose we could convince “Artist George” to do some nickel carvings for all of us to treasure... that would be too much to hope for!  ~ V-Dubya
Portraits are property of  • NORTH COUNTRY GRAPHICS, POBox 770328, Eagle River, Alaska 99577 • 907-688-9770
Click for a sharper version of this Rodgers portrait. Click for a sharper version of this Rodgers portrait. Click for a sharper version of this Rodgers portrait.
Click for a sharper version of this Rodgers portrait. Click for a sharper version of this Rodgers portrait. Click for a sharper version of this Rodgers portrait.
Click to access the Alaskan/NorthCountry website.
Click on any portrait for a sharper version. 
I've tried contacting “Artist George” many times this last week but his phone is always busy. His www.Alaskan.com EMail address is invalid. -vrw 6/18/05
137 
2 June 2005
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Imperatoris Caesaris Traiani Hadriani Augusti” Click camera to see this person.
Emperor Hadrian, “Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus” (AD 117-138), was the first Roman emperor to wear a beard, setting a fashion that was followed by his successors. It's said that, in his case, he used his beard to cover up facial blemishes, but it's as likely it was due to his love affair with the Greek world. Either way, no fashionable Roman was to be seen without a carefully clipped beard in the mid-2nd century AD. Beards got gradually longer over the next hundred years, until stubbly beards and short cropped hair came into fashion around AD 230.
Again Mike Cirelli shows his true colors and serves up a superlative nickel carving unique unto himself! Way to go Michael! ~ V-Dubya
Wikipedia:HadrianClick to access the Wikipedia website. Click camera to see this person.   Browsing Roman Imperial Coinage of HadrianClick to access the WildWinds website.
136 
 Carving Chips.....   • Looking for an Actual Photograph of Sacramento No.1 • 
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
The enlargement that you see when you click on this sketch is the best likeness of this Locomotive I've found thus far.
Even a photo of a different Locomotive of this precise type would help!   A “sister” Locomotive in other words.
Verne R. Walrafen ...
135 
 Carving Chips.....   • B&BMedal ... “Bo&Bert” not “Bed&Breakfast” • 
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Mike Cirelli's 2oz silver carving for Bill Fivaz.
134 
31 May 2005

   W. Eddings ~ Gadsden, Alabama.
   I called the newspaper (The Gadsden Times) in Gadsden, Alabama to obtain the obituary for Wabon Eddings. The paper directed me to the local public library. I just received a photocopy of the funeral notice for Eddings from the Gadsden Public Library.
   
Alpert's Later Modern Artist

Funerals - The Gadsden Times / Friday, April 16, 1999
Eddings, Wabon A.
   Funeral will be at 11 am. Saturday at Crestwood Chapel for Wabon A. Eddings, 82, Gadsden, who died Thursday, April 15, 1999. The Rev. Don Pendergrass will officiate. Burial in Crestwood Cemetery. Crestwood Funeral Home is in charge. Mr. Eddings was a native of Amory, Mississippi, lived in Gadsden (Alabama) since 1945; Veteran of World War II; retired from Republic Steel and member of East Gadsden Baptist Church.
   He was preceded in death by his Wife, Gladys Eddings. He is survived by his daughter, Micki Jane Pruitt; son-in-law, Charles Pruitt one grandson, Aaron Pruitt; brother, James R. Eddings; sister, Mary Neil Smith and a number of nieces and nephews. Honorary pallbearers will be Mr. Ralph O. Rowe Sr., Jimmy Bearden, Joe Bearden and Bill Bearden. The family will receive friends from 9-11 Saturday morning at the funeral home.

   Eddings annually attended the Hobo Convention in Britt, Iowa for years (70s-90s) and worked in the railroad roundhouse for Republic Steel in Gadsden, Alabama. ~ Ralph “Hobo Bazoo” Winter... Thursday, 5/26/2005 6:54PM

133 
 Carving Chips.....   • Steve Ellsworth's First Nickel Carvings • 
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Steve also recarved his first nickel... currently being offered on eBay.      
Two more of Steve's first few nickel carvings.
132 
30 May 2005
That Just Wasn't “Good Enough”! ...a Bill Jameson “recarved” nickel
Hard to believe, a second unusual nickel carving related item encounter within as many days... a “before” scan of a nickel carving that didn't measure up to the carver's expectations. Infrequently does a carver bother to generate such a scan and then have the self confidence to release said scan. Bill Jameson is a talented carver who demands perfection in his artistic creations. Most folks would be well satisfied with the first obverse carving but Bill was convinced he needed to improve on it... particularly considering how much time he had invested in the reverse “Lion” carving ...obviously he did so.
       
Click on any nickel carving image for an enlargement.
Can you believe the perfectly smooth fields on both versions? WOW!!! ~ V-Dubya
131 
29 May 2005

 An Impressive Body of Work!
One seldom encounters documentation of all an artist's nickel carvings... so I couldn't pass up showing all y'all Lee Griffiths' archive from his website. ~ V-Dubya

Click each individual nickel carving image for an enlargement.
130 
24 May 2005

Preeminent “Jungle” Cook
A Bill Jameson
original nickel carving.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Angus T., his full name is Angus Typha Angustifolia, is well known for his ability to harvest almost any variety of cattail NarrowLeaf, Common, Dwarf, Variegated, Graceful 卆nd for making a tasty stew that hasn抰 made anyone ill yet! He always has plenty of both shallots and garlic in his bindle since they are a required part of any successful cattail cuisine.
In season he always adds a healthy helping of wild rice. Some folks prefer his crawdad, freshwater clams and frog-leg version but a few carrots and a wayward rooster always seems to produce his most popular efforts. He has been known to make do with a rabbit, a squirrel or even a slow opossum upon occasion he just doesn抰 tell his customers. His trademark cattail, shallots and garlic ingredients are always central to anything he cooks and nobody ever complains.

129 
23 May 2005
The First Railroad Ride in California” ~ SVRR ~ August 17, 1855
Locomotive “Sacramento No.1”
“The Sacramento Union” ~ March 31, 1920
Click image to read this newspaper clipping. Supersize this picture!
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph. “Still laying track eastward at the rate of six hundred feet per day, the crews reached 17th Street in Sacramento on August 16th, 1855, where a bridge over a slough marked the eastern terminus temporarily. While the Sheriff was performing his duty by quieting the reluctant widow, on the 17th of August an excursion train including the locomotive, Sacramento, a tender, three platform cars, and some two hundred passengers set forth from the foot of R Street. Two days later the company's president, C.K.Garrison conducted a more exclusive run for the company directors and some of the stockholders. The train was clocked at thirty miles per hour as it crossed 10th Street.”
Building the Sacramento Valley Railroad Click to access locally archived copy of Briggs article.” −by Robert Briggs, 9/22/1957
The End of the Line for “Sacramento No.1~ Fall of 1866
New Use for an Old Engine: “Workers began clearing the 8-by-12-foot shaft on August 27 and made good progress for the first 30 days, at which point the job of hoisting rubble from the shaft via hand derrick became too hard. Engineers found a solution in the abandoned Sacramento, the locomotive that had taken the first pioneering ride on Theodore Judah's Sacramento Valley Railroad. Stripped of all non-essential parts, it was driven to Gold Run, at that point the end of the Central Pacific tracks. Its wheels were removed and its body transferred to a logging truck driven by ten yoke of oxen. In a dangerous and treacherous effort, the freight team hauled what remained of the Sacramento -- a twelve-ton steam engine -- to the top of Donner Pass, where it was let down carefully above Tunnel No. 6 and housed in the large wooden enclosure now surrounding the sunken shaft. The whole process took six weeks.”
People & Events: Tunneling in the Sierra Nevada Click to access locally archived copy of Tunneling article.” −from PBS Online, c.2003
Sacramento Valley Railroad Steam Locomotive “Second No.1” ~ c.1869-79
Locomotive “Second No.1”
“California State Railroad Museum Library”
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“Sacramento Valley Railroad 4-4-0 steam locomotive 'Pioneer.' Inscription on back reads “Negative made in early 70s by E. L. Johnson, a Sacramento photographer son of Joseph Johnson of Sacto [sic] Valley Ry. Property of Mrs. Scott [illegible] daughter of E. L. Johnson.” The second No. 1 'Pioneer' was built by the Globe Locomotive Works in Boston, Massachusetts in 1849, apparently for a railroad in Virginia. Not delivered, it was instead shipped to San Francisco, arriving in 1851, named 'Elephant' and placed in storage.”
Historic Sacramento Photograph and Document Archive” −from Sacramento History Online, c.2003
Click each individual progressive nickel carving image for an enlargement. Another first... Dick Sheehan's First Locomotive nickel carving    Not Locomotive “Sacramento No.1” however.
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128 
  Carving Chips.....   • Unemployed MKT Workers” −by Lee Griffiths •  
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MKT Locomotive #124, c.1890's
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Restored MKT Cabooses in Clinton, Missouri and in Oklahoma
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MKT Station, Denison, TX
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                        These highly qualified former MKT workers have accepted lucrative positions in the Kansa Territories!  

127 
7 May 2005
A Handful of Feathers” -from Harper's Weekly... November 29, 1884
A hobo trying to steal a chicken by A.B.Frost
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Here we have an archetypical “Hobo” with his bindle on the ground, his shoe tied on with an old rag, wearing a threadbare coat with ragged sleeves... scrounging for a meal without any success. What struck me as noteworthy is that this gent hails from 1884... almost fifty years before the “Great Depression” which is the timeframe that I generally think of when contemplating hobos. I just felt this was interesting and I wanted to share this sketch with all y'all. ~ V-Dubya
126 
6 May 2005
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~~~ My View for the Last Three Weeks ~~~
It has been an intense time here in the Kansa Territories. Lotsa new “stuff”... 250GB hard drive, LightScribe CD-ROM drive, Windows XP Pro operating system and Office 2003 Pro ...all for my Desktop computer. Also a “new to me” Compaq Armada 1750 Laptop computer with the same new operating system and office software but with a DOA floppy drive and a modem which failed after three days. It is amazing how many previously established functions in my old operating system had to be recreated in my new environment. LOTS of overnights but I think I am 98% of the way there now... if my dang BroadBand Satellite downlink will just quit being so intermittent! Now to catch-up on the website maintenance that I'm so far behind on. ~ V-Dubya
125 
5 May 2005

Albert Einstein ~ by three currently active nickel carvers.
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Einstein ~ J. Allen
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Al” ~ Cliff Kraft
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E=MC2 ~ Bob Shamey
Albert and ET −by Ralph “Hobo Bazoo” Winter, OHNS-LM37
I was doing a little organizing of my hobo nickels and found I had a couple of fun like themes that I thought would be fun to share with OHNS members. Three of my hobo nickels have Albert Einstein as the subject. The first was carved several years ago by J. Allen. In January 2004 I acquired my first Cliff Kraft carving, a whimsical 揂lbert. Then in this past January抯 OHNS FUN Auction, I picked up Bob Shamey抯 Albert Einstein.
Speaking of Bob Shamey... In March of 2004 I acquired my first Shamey carving, his 揜oswell Area 51 Alien. In March of this year, I saw Owen Covert抯 揂lien Mutant offered on eBay, and I thought it would be a nice companion to Shamey抯 揂lien. Just this month I picked up 揇arth Vader by new nickel carver Paul Fort. It抯 carved on a 2005 Jefferson nickel. Ralph Winter... Wednesday, 27 April 2005 8:54am
Roswell Area51 ~ Bob Shamey
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Alien Mutant ~ Robert Covert
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Darth Vader ~ Paul Fort
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Extraterrestrial Themes ~ by three currently active nickel carvers.

About My Darth Vader Hobo Nickel...
Hi Ralph... My name is Paul Fort (PF). Let me start by saying this is the first nickel I have sold. I have collected a few hobo nickels one of which my father bought me. I became interested in design engraving first. I have two trumpets that I try to play. One of them is a King super 20. Well back in the day, engraving on trumpets was quite elaborate (one particular example is the “Naked Lady”) Well I started looking up how to engrave and the tools needed. I first bought some hand push gravers from ebay and I graduated up to some GRS hand push gravers.
I did a search for engraving forums and found and joined “Hand Engravers”, which is where I was introduced to Hobo nickels. I first saw one carved by Bill Zach on this forum. I have never heard or seen such a creation. My father is an avid coin and currency collector, but he knew very little about the Hobo nickels except that there are a few dealers who sell them and have OHNS signs on their displays. The more I learned the more I thought I could practice engraving on nickels. My first attempt was an image of my son (about 1 year old). I have practiced his face many times. I plan on getting it perfect. I also used examples of others carvings but these are not my own ideas and so I only refer to them as learning lessons.
I purchased a head visor, then a ball vise, then a microscope, then a Lindsay classic AirGraver (by Steve Lindsay) and then ........Well, I think you get the picture. I really like working on such a small scale in a creative fashion. I find it to be very peaceful and rewarding. I am eager to expand my creativity and create some nice carvings.
I want to thank you for expressing such an interest in my first piece. My initials (PF) are very small on the lower collar of the bust. This is the only one of this nature that I will do. I will not carve Darth Vader on another coin. So this is a one and only. I am calling this coin Number One. Paul Fort... Wednesday, 20 April 2005 3:33:18am

124 
 Carving Chips.....   • Jewish Hobo Nickels” -from The Shekel... March-April 2004 • 
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Click on any image to read that page.
123 
  Carving Chips.....   • The Apple Orchard Raider” −by Steven “Mr.Chips” Adams •  
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Nickel Carving in Process
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Medal Carving in Process
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Apple Orchard Raider”
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The Raider's Booty”
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